Welcome to the Amira-Avizo Software Use Case Gallery

Below you will find a collection of use cases of our 3D data visualization and analysis software. These use cases include scientific publications, articles, papers, posters, presentations or even videos that show how Amira-Avizo Software is used to address various scientific and industrial research topics.

Use the Domain selector to filter by main application area, and use the Search box to enter keywords related to specific topics you are interested in.

Human liver segments: role of cryptic liver lobes and vascular physiology in the development of liver veins and left-right asymmetry

Human liver segments: role of cryptic liver lobes and vascular physiology in the development of liver veins and left-right asymmetry

Couinaud based his well-known subdivision of the liver into (surgical) segments on the branching order of portal veins and the location of hepatic veins. However, both segment boundaries and number remain controversial due to an incomplete understanding of the role of liver lobes and vascular physiology on hepatic venous development. Human embryonic livers (5–10 weeks of development) were visualized with Amira 3D-reconstruction and Cinema 4D-remodeling software.

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Jill P. J. M. Hikspoors, Mathijs M. J. P. Peeters, Nutmethee Kruepunga, Hayelom K. Mekonen, Greet M. C. Mommen, S. Eleonore Köhler & Wouter H. Lamers

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The London Centre for Nanotechnology uses Avizo Software to reveal structure of human chromosomes and nucleus in 3D

The London Centre for Nanotechnology uses Avizo Software to reveal structure of human chromosomes and nucleus in 3D

A team led by London Centre for Nanotechnology researchers, Prof. Ian Robinson and Dr. Bo Chen (now a professor at the Tongji University, Shanghai) used newly-developed serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) and Thermo Scientific™ Avizo® Software, one dominant tool in 3D reconstructed image processing, to reveal the spatial structure of human chromosomes and nucleus quantitatively at high resolution of approximately 50 nm in three dimensions.

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Prof. Ian Robinson, Dr. Bo Chen, London Centre for Nechnology, UCL and Tongji University

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